Scotland – Falls of Foyers’ bursting torrents flow

Known in Gaelic as the smokey waterfall, the Falls of Foyers is the epitome of beauty in the Scottish Highlands.
The river Foyers drops a spectacular 140 feet into the falls, before running into Loch Ness.
Incredibly that drop is said to be nothing compared to what it used to be in Victorian times.
It is accessed by a steep, but well made path through the spectacular greenery of the forested slopes of this part of the Highlands.

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

The view at the top is certainly worth the trek, with the water thundering down, even on a day when there had been little rain.
And visitors can take in the sights in the knowledge that they are sharing a scene taken in by more upper class eyes.
The Falls of Foyer were a popular destination for the gentry of Victorian times, who would arrive by paddle steamer from Inverness.

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness

Prior to that they were the muse of perhaps the most celebrated of Scottish poets, Robert Burns.
In 1787, he wrote the following poem about the falls:

Among the heathy hills and ragged woods
The roaring Foyers pours his mossy floods;
Till full he dashes on the rocky mounds,
Where, through a shapeless breach, his stream resounds,
As high in air the bursting torrents flow,
As deep-recoiling surges foam below,
Prone down the rock the whitening sheet descends,
And viewless Echo’s ear, astonish’d rends.
Dim seen, through rising mists and ceaseless showers,
The hoary cavern, wide-surrounding, lowers.
Still, through the gap the struggling river toils,
And still, below, the horrid cauldron boils.

Falls of Foyers, Loch Ness


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